Laser Dental TreatmentFor many years the use of lasers in dentistry has been a niche interest. Awareness is growing, however, of the significant clinical benefits they offer to patient and operator for the treatment of everyday dental problems.

In some instances the results are exceptionally good and very difficult, if not impossible to achieve by any other method. Laser light has unique properties that allow for rapid healing and the potential capacity to help lost tissues regenerate. This is an area which is attracting a good deal of international attention and is the subject of ongoing research.

I have recently returned from the latest part of my MSc course, acutely aware of the challenge I face in getting to grips with the vast knowledge base that exists on the use of lasers in dentistry to the satisfaction of my professors. Living here on the Island there are always so many potential distractions, and maybe as the weather deteriorates I might finally get my nose down and start some serious studying! I am highly motivated to introduce some of the new treatment applications at Amery House and I am looking forward to one of my hygienists, Cathy Adamou, qualifying as one of the first laser-using hygienists in the UK. Once the latest piece of equipment arrives, Cathy will be able to offer an additional therapy to the normal hygiene treatment where she will be using the laser to destroy harmful bacteria infecting the gum tissue as well as stimulating healing and reducing post treatment sensitivity. This type of laser bacterial reduction has many benefits that traditional methods can find difficult to manage.

There is a growing evidence base associating gum disease with a wide range of major health problems including an increased risk of stroke, atherosclerotic vascular disease, respiratory ailments as well as some types of arthritis. It has been suggested that someone with unhealthy gums has the equivalent to a wound equal to the size of a teacup saucer. This allows the free entry of harmful bacteria into the patient’s general circulation possibly resulting in major medical issues in later life. The ability of the laser to both kill off harmful bugs, as well as stimulating healing and repair is a major potential benefit in dealing with an otherwise awkward to manage condition. I have been using lasers as an aid to dealing with gum disease for four years now with some wonderful results; and some of my colleagues who have seen the outcomes have been kind enough to send me some of their patients. In my opinion it is only a matter of time before laser use in dental practice becomes commonplace and research will be ongoing. Specialist periodontists are very interested and some have already successfully integrated laser gum care into their practices.

As with all of the services we offer at Amery House we do not charge more for the hi-tech approach. Plus we offer a membership plan to our patients that offers a 10% discount off our normal rates along with lots of other benefits including free tooth whitening. More information on this can be found on our website at www.ameryhouse.com or call our helpful receptionist on 01983 291863.